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Sata Controller Error

] Print view Previous topic | Next topic Author Message jdituro Post subject: Testing SATA HDD Controllers on the MotherboardPosted: February 7th, 2012, 12:36 Joined: February 7th, 2012, 12:25Posts: 5Location: Newburgh,

Motherboard Sata Ports Not Working

NY, USA What is the best external software or plugin device to evaluate the heath

Diagnose Sata Controller

of HDD contollers (SATA and IDE) on the motherboards. Top hddguy Post subject: Re: Testing SATA HDD Controllers on the MotherboardPosted: sata controller dead February 7th, 2012, 12:38 Joined: November 9th, 2006, 15:15Posts: 2916 something that supports SMART... Top jdituro Post subject: Re: Testing SATA HDD Controllers on the MotherboardPosted: February 7th, 2012, 12:43 Joined: February 7th, 2012, 12:25Posts: http://www.tomshardware.com/answers/id-1884123/bad-sata-controller-bad-hard-drive.html 5Location: Newburgh, NY, USA Not necessarily. I not all motherboards comply, or have chipsets that support S.M.A.R.T. I am looking for some external software tool or diagnostic device that I can attach and run to evlauate the condition of the SATA controllers Top Vulcan Post subject: Re: Testing SATA HDD Controllers on the MotherboardPosted: February 7th, 2012, 13:35 Joined: May 6th, 2008, 22:53Posts: 2138Location: England I note that you're talking about motherboard controllers and not https://forum.hddguru.com/viewtopic.php?t=21981&start= disks - motherboards have minimal interaction with the SMART specification, but before getting into that:What amount of confidence are you hoping to get from your test? Does it have to be 100%?What level of detail are you hoping to test e.g. just basic electrical voltages? Or rise&fall times (IDE) / eye patterns (SATA) as well? Or detailed protocol tests? Or something else?What limits do you have on testing time & device cost?What have you already considered & eliminated (if anything)?What can you tell us about the context e.g. Is this PC motherboard testing for consumers, or are you designing new motherboard PCBs from scratch, or ...?Without answers to those questions to help beter understand your requirements & expectations, then IMHO the options are too wide... Top jdituro Post subject: Re: Testing SATA HDD Controllers on the MotherboardPosted: February 7th, 2012, 14:01 Joined: February 7th, 2012, 12:25Posts: 5Location: Newburgh, NY, USA Vulcan wrote:I note that you're talking about motherboard controllers and not disks - motherboards have minimal interaction with the SMART specification, but before getting into that:What amount of confidence are you hoping to get from your test? Does it have to be 100%?What level of detail are you hoping to test e.g. just basic electrical voltages? Or rise&fall times (IDE) / eye patterns (SATA) as well? Or detailed protocol tests? Or something else?What limits do you have on testi

Links Notable Members Current Visitors Recent Activity New Profile Posts Search Search titles only Posted by Member: Separate names with a comma. Newer Than: Search this thread only Search this forum only Display results as threads More... Recent Posts Menu Log in or Sign up [H]ard|Forum Forums > https://hardforum.com/threads/failing-hdd-or-bad-sata-controller.1490577/ [H]ard|Ware > General Hardware > Failing HDD or Bad SATA Controller Discussion in 'General Hardware' started by http://www.adir1.com/2012/01/solved-the-driver-detected-a-controller-error-on-deviceideideport2/ Doom4life, Jan 29, 2010. Jan 29, 2010 #1 Doom4life Limp Gawd Messages: 196 Joined: Dec 31, 2006 This is going to be a long post, so I apologize in advance. I'm trying to figure out if I have an issue with my 320GB Seagate 7200.10 or if its the SATA controller on my K8N mobo that is causing me problems. I bought a Radeon X850 Pro sata controller and unlocked it and overclocked it to a Radeon X850 XT PE early in 2007. In most games, no artifacting occurred. However, when TF2 was released I noticed some mild artifacting occuring. It was livable as I was enjoying the faster framerates compared to the stock x850 Pro. Anyways, in 2009 I started having random system lockups while playing TF2. The sound would go in a .5 second loop and I'd have to restart the computer in order for it to go away. This motherboard sata port was usually once every month or two, and one time I left it frozen to see what would happen and I got an ATI VPU recover message. However, with the advent of L4D2 (and me becoming unemployed and having a lot more time to game), I got sick of the artifacting. So I flashed the videocard to an x850 XT (I used atitool to ensure I would get no artifacting at the speed of an XT). I decided to use winflash as opposed to a DOS based BIOS flasher and it froze halfway into the flash. I soft restarted it, and it loaded Windows XP fine, however the ATI Catalyst Control Center gave me an error message stating that a compatible ATI card wasn't found. I tried to reflash it in Windows again and winflash said it couldn't erase the BIOS. This time, I turned off the computer for a brief period and turned it back on again. As you guessed it, the videocard was no longer working. After doing a blindflash in DOS, I succesfully got the card working again. Windows XP loaded up, and the ATI CCC gave the same error message. I decided to uninstall and reinstall the ATI software, but halfway through the uninstall, Windows gave me a BSOD (didn't think of writing it down). This is when the problems started happening. Once I restarted, Windows XP completely froze at varying parts. Sometimes it would hang at the loading screen, sometimes it would loa

ordeal with this Event 11 that Windows quietly generates. It took us few weeks to fully work out why Windows suddenly started hanging, misbehaving or even crashing with blue screen. Now that I feel it is fully resolved, I thought I’d share my conclusion (and the process) – hopefully it will help few others out there who are struggling with this. Ridiculously, many people are likely affected by this issue, but unless they open Event Viewer and search for this event id 11, they will not realize that hanging is not “normal” behavior, even for Windows! OS seems to silently recover from this problem 10 to 60 seconds later, which is really strange in my book – considering that user isn’t even alerted to this serious atapi error. For impatient souls among us, here are my conclusions: First thing – check the SATA/EIDE and power cable connection between your hard-drive and the motherboard. If possible, try another SATA outlet on motherboard or another SATA cable if available. If it still happens, the bad news is that this is likely a disk controller error, which is especially problematic since nowadays disk controllers are built into the Motherboard. If you are in a budget crunch, one potential workaround is to slow down your HD to use different PIO. This may avoid hangs, but will slow overall performance, so no fun solution… Proper solution appears to be to replace motherboard, hence replacing disk controller. There are many motherboards starting at just $50 and in most cases it will improve overall performance and stability for you, even if you keep the same CPU and other components. I am pretty confident that this is the right diagnosis, as we went through a lot of trial and error investigative work, in a space of few weeks, after it started abruptly. At first, I was pretty much convinced that HD is dying. The system had two hard-drives, and the older hard-drive was seemingly working just fine, even with the same SATA cable and connected to the same slot on the Motherboard. Turns out it was using slower PIO by virtue of it being older HDD. During the troubleshooting process I reinstalled fresh Windows 7 64 Bit multiple times, on various HD drives, only to see the issue start happening almost instantly after clean install. Few days ago a fresh HDD became available (separate long story), so I tried replacing the “dying” HD. Guess what, it being newer HD, it was instantly affected by the same issue, even though I put clean Windows there also. Thus it was concluded that controller was faulty, and I went shopping for a new motherboard. As an aside – DDR3 memory is Ridiculous

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