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Redirect Standard Error Ksh

do I redirect error messages? Note: The following information pertains primarily to Bourne-like shells, such as sh, ksh, and bash. To redirect standard error messages to a file, enter: command 2> file Replace

Ksh Redirect Output To File

command with the command you want to execute and file with the file to ksh redirect stderr and stdout to /dev/null which you want to direct the errors, for example: gunzip * 2> ~/errors If you wish to suppress error messages, enter:

Ksh Redirect Stderr To Dev Null

command 2>&- If you wish to redirect error messages to standard output, enter: command 2>&1 You can direct both standard error and standard out messages to an output file by entering the following: command > ksh redirect output to file and screen file 2>&1 The csh and tcsh shells have substantially less flexible redirection capabilities. However, from sh or tcsh you can invoke a Bourne-like shell to run a command that redirects standard error messages. To redirect standard error messages, enter the following: ksh -c 'commands' You can use sh or bash in the place of ksh. Replace commands with redirection syntax, for example: ksh -c 'ls -l foo 2> ~/notfound' At Indiana ksh if University, for personal or departmental Linux or Unix systems support, see At IU, how do I get support for Linux or Unix? Related documents Introduction to Unix commands In Unix, where can I get information on differences between the various shells? This is document agvw in the Knowledge Base. Last modified on 2008-08-22 00:00:00. I need help with a computing problem Fill out this form to submit your issue to the UITS Support Center. Please note that you must be affiliated with Indiana University to receive support. All fields are required. Full name Email address Please provide your IU email address. If you currently have a problem receiving email at your IU account, enter an alternate email address. Relationship to Indiana University --Select One-- Student Faculty member Staff member Affiliate Alumnus/Alumna Applicant Emeritus faculty member Parent Retired staff member Other Please enter your question or describe your problem Captcha Submit I have a comment for the Knowledge Base Fill out this form to submit your comment to the IU Knowledge Base. If you are affiliated with Indiana University and need help with a computing problem, please use the I need help with a computing problem section above, or contact your campus Support Center. Full name Email address Please pro

ls | wc -l But bourne-shell derivatives give you even more power than that. Most properly written programs output in one of

Ksh Tutorial

two ways. Progress messages go to stdout, error messages go to stderr ksh tee Data goes to stdout, error AND progress messsages go to stderr If you know which of the categories

Ksh Compare Strings

your utilities fall into, you can do interesting things. Redirection An uncommon program to use for this example is the "fuser" program under solaris. it gives you a long listing https://kb.iu.edu/d/agvw of what processes are using a particular file. For example: $ fuser /bin/sh /bin/sh: 13067tm 21262tm If you wanted to see just the processes using that file, you might initially groan and wonder how best to parse it with awk or something. However, fuser actually splits up the data for you already. It puts the stuff you may not care http://www.bolthole.com/solaris/ksh-redirection.html about on stderr, and the meaty 'data' on stdout. So if you throw away stderr, with the '2>' special redirect, you get $ fuser /bin/sh 2>/dev/null 13067 21262 which is then trivially usable. Unfortunately, not all programs are that straightforward :-) However, it is good to be aware of these things, and also of status returns. The 'grep' command actually returns a status based on whether it found a line. The status of the last command is stored in the '$?' variable. So if all you care about is, "is 'biggles' in /etc/hosts?" you can do the following: grep biggles /etc/hosts >/dev/null if [[ $? -eq 0 ]] ; then echo YES else echo NO fi As usual, there are lots of other ways to accomplish this task, even using the same 'grep' command. However, this method has the advantage that it does not waste OS cycles with a temp file, nor does it waste memory with a potentially very long variable. (If you were looking for something that could potentially match hundreds of lines, then var=`grep something

Scripting BSD, Linux, and UNIX shell scripting Post awk, bash, csh, ksh, perl, php, python, sed, sh, shell scripts, and other shell scripting languages questions http://www.unix.com/shell-programming-and-scripting/32683-stderr-output.html here. Search Forums Show Threads Show Posts Tag Search Advanced Search Unanswered Threads Find All Thanked Posts Go to Page... learn linux and unix commands - unix shell scripting http://www.cyberciti.biz/faq/unix-linux-redirect-error-output-to-null-command/ STDERR output Shell Programming and Scripting Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes #1 11-07-2006 gilberteu Registered User Join Date: Feb ksh redirect 2006 Last Activity: 19 February 2015, 1:07 PM EST Posts: 16 Thanks: 3 Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts STDERR output Hi, Need some help here on a script I'm writing. I know that STDERR is normally done is this manner: script 2>stderr.out However, if I wanted to output the stderr from a rsh command how do I do that? Example: su - ksh redirect output username -c "rsh $hostname /opt/gilberteu/scriptname" 1>stdout 2>stderr If the scriptname doesn't exist, an error will be shown on the screen instead of it going to the stderr file. Any ideas? Remove advertisements Sponsored Links gilberteu View Public Profile Find all posts by gilberteu #2 11-07-2006 gilberteu Registered User Join Date: Feb 2006 Last Activity: 19 February 2015, 1:07 PM EST Posts: 16 Thanks: 3 Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts I think I found an alternative: su - username -c "rsh $hostname /opt/gilberteu/scriptname 2>stderr" 1>stdout Remove advertisements Sponsored Links gilberteu View Public Profile Find all posts by gilberteu #3 11-07-2006 srikanthus2002 Registered User Join Date: Sep 2006 Last Activity: 14 October 2011, 3:22 PM EDT Location: Can u guess...! Posts: 161 Thanks: 0 Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts This will clear your douts 1> filename #Redirect stdout to file "filename" 1>>filename #Redirect and append stdout to file "filename" 2> filename #Redirect stderr to file "filename" 2>>filename ##Redirect and append stderr to file "filename" &> filename ##Redirect both stderr and stdout to file "filename" srikanthus2002 View Public Profile Find all

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standard error redirect ksh
Standard Error Redirect Ksh p do I redirect error messages Note The following information pertains primarily to Bourne-like shells such as sh ksh and ksh redirect output to file bash To redirect standard error messages to a file enter command ksh redirect stderr and stdout to dev null file Replace command with the command you want to execute and file with the file to p Ksh Redirect Stderr To Dev Null p which you want to direct the errors for example gunzip errors If you wish to suppress error messages enter command - If you wish to redirect p Ksh

unix ksh error redirection
Unix Ksh Error Redirection p do I redirect error messages Note The following information pertains primarily to Bourne-like shells such as sh ksh and bash To redirect standard error messages to a file ksh redirect stderr and stdout to file enter command file Replace command with the command you want to execute p Ksh Redirect Stderr To File p and file with the file to which you want to direct the errors for example gunzip errors p Ksh Redirect Output To File p If you wish to suppress error messages enter command - If you wish to redirect error messages